WALL-E

June 12, 2008 • By

Due to release on June 27, 2008, Disney/Pixar film WALL-E is characterized as animation, family, comedy, sci-fi, and romance. WALL-E is a curious robot who is forgotten on earth when humans leave. Throughout the film, WALL-E develops a love interest in another robot, Eve.

WALL-E is produced by Andrew Stanton, who most recently produced Finding Nemo, written by Stanton and Jim Capobianco, and produced by Jim Morris (previously employed by Lucas Film). The music score is composed by Thomas Newman, who also composed the score for Finding Nemo. Stanton conceived of WALL-E before the film Toy Story was produced, but chose to work on Monsters, Inc. next instead because he was hesitant to release a love story film.

WALL-E takes place in the year 2700, the little robots’ name stands for Waste Allocation Load Lifter – Earth Class. Rather than give the films’ characters human voices, Ben Burtt designed sounds for each robot that resemble voices.

Pixar is marketing WALL-E without the help of Disney because of the companies previous disagreement over the marketing of Ratatouille.

There are numerous traditional advertisements for the film, including bus stop wraps, and promotional posters and billboards (strong in Russia and Poland). Comic book artist Eric Tan created 1950s style post cards to help promote the film. However, The WALL-E campaign relies heavily on viral marketing.

Pixar created a fake promotional website: buynlarge.com. The website looks completely real, with its made up copy and products – it even has fake advertisements. Pixar released promotions that lead people to the Buy N Large (BNL) site to learn about robots similar to those in the film.

The strongest viral component of the WALL-E campaign is a series of featurettes showing WALL-E encountering everyday items and discovering them with a playful curiosity. These items include a ball, a hula hoop and headphones.

A similar television advertisement that aired during the NBA Celtics / Lakers game showed WALL-E discovering a basketball.

An ad during this year’s Super Bowl showed Toy Story characters Woody and Buzz Lightyear watching the WALL-E trailer on TV.

Pixar has also released numerous versions of the trailer for WALL-E both in the US and internationally.

Before the first trailer for WALL-E was even released, a promotional video for the $199 WALL-E Robot was put online. The robot, scheduled to come out this summer, has a remote control that is responsible for directing the robots 10 motors. The robot also has numerous respond sensors.

Many movie theaters have WALL-E standees, but some even have benches with Eve floating on one end, and WALL-E standing on the other. The benches are not only a useful place for movie-goers to relax while they wait, but also will be given away after the promotion for WALL-E is over – a constant form of advertising for years to come.

Wall E Theater Display

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